Tiny but Mighty

In France they are called Nosiettes, in Spain, Cortados, and in Portugal, Pingos. By whatever name you call them, I love them! Why? Because they are tasty, tiny, and they pack a wallop in the best possible way.

I first discovered the Noisette at Chez Janou, a Provençal restaurant in Paris. It is the perfect finish to a meal – a liquid dessert that happens to be caffeinated. One of its best features is the lovely dollop of steamed milk on top. Straight espresso is a bit too harsh for my taste, but a Noisette with hot milk and sugar – yum!

Soon after Paris, I discovered that a version of this delicious beverage also exists in Switzerland, and I had one after a delicious lunch with a dear friend in Zurich. Then we moved on to Provence, where Noisettes are sometimes served in tiny shot glasses, or sometimes in charming little cups. Anything miniaturized always catches my fancy, but combine it with the chance to caffeinate, and it is irresistible.

After a five-day stay in Provence we made a way too brief soujourn to Les Lavandou at the southern tip of the Riviera, where, once again I found Noisettes. Then we took the high speed TGV to Girona, a jewel of a small city in Catalonia. I inquired about this delicious beverage I had discovered in France and was told that the Spanish version was called a Cortado. Imagine my delight!

On top of that, there is a decaf version, so my cutoff for having a Cortado could now extend into the evening hours. I had Cortados in Girona, more Cortados in Barcelona, and there, discovered the Portuguese version called a Pingo. Portuguese espresso is slightly richer and nuttier than its French and Spanish cousins, and equally delicious.

There are an infinite variety of cups to contain this beverage, some glass, some ceramic. Typically, the ceramic version is white, but not always. Somewhere in Mallorca, I had a Cortado in a multicolored cup with a red handle. Wahoo!

Why do I wax rhapsodic about this beverage? For me, it symbolizes the cafe culture I have come to love, and which I already miss dreadfully. Most restaurants will not bring a Cortado or Noisette with dessert – it comes after. It is meant to be savored on its own.  And they most certainly will not bring you a check while you are drinking one. We had to beg for our bills after meals, and often waited up to 30 minutes to receive them.

No one in France or Spain rushes a meal, or even an afternoon snack. Eating and drinking with friends in cafes is sacred time. People think nothing of doing it for hours. What we Americans might consider wasting time, is elevated to an art form. The Noisette or Cortado or Pingo is the final brush stroke on a masterpiece. I heartily approve of this custom!